CS367 Homework 3
Lecture 4, Fall 2017
Due by 11:59 pm on Friday, October 27 (not accepted late)

Questions

Homework assignments must be done individually. Collaboration on homework assignments is not allowed.

  1. Assume that general trees are implemented using a Treenode class that includes the following fields and methods:

    // fields
    private T data;
    private List<Treenode<T>> children;
     
    // methods
    public T getData() { return data; }
    public List<Treenode<T>> getChildren() { return children; }

    For efficiency, use an iterator to access the children in the list returned by the method getChildren (as we've done in lecture). You may assume that getChildren never returns null: if a node is a leaf, then getChildren will return a non-null list containing zero elements.

    Write an isBinary method whose header is given below.

    public boolean isBinary( Treenode<T> n )

    The method should determine if the general tree rooted by n is also a binary tree. A binary tree is recursively defined as:

    • An empty tree is binary.
    • A leaf node is a binary tree.
    • A node with 1 or 2 children is binary if each child is itself a binary tree.


  2. Assume that binary trees are implemented using a BinaryTreenode class that includes the following fields and methods:

    // fields
    private T data;
    private BinaryTreenode<T> left, right;
     
    // methods
    public T getData()                { return data; }
    public BinaryTreenode<T> getLeft()        { return left; }
    public BinaryTreenode<T> getRight()       { return right; }
    public void setLeft(BinaryTreenode<T> newL)  { left  = newL; }
    public void setRight(BinaryTreenode<T> newR) { right = newR; }

    Write the findNegatives method whose header is given below.

    public static List<Integer> findNegatives( BinaryTreenode<Integer> n)

    The method should return a list containing all the negative values in a binary tree containing Integer data. For example, if the tree pointed to by n looks like this:

            -6
            / \
           /   \
         -4     5
         /     / \
        9     8  -1
       / \     \   \
      7  -3     2   0
    

    then findInRange(n) should return a list containing -6, -4, -1, and -3 (not necessarily in this order). If the same value appears more than once in the tree, it should also appear more than once in the result list.

    Part A: First, complete the English descriptions of the base and recursive cases, like what was given above for Question 1.

    • The list of negative values in an empty tree is the empty list.
    • The list of negative values in a tree with one node is (fill in your answer here)
    • The list of negative values in a tree with more than one node is (fill in your answer here)

    Part B: Now write the findInNegatives method. You may assume that the List used to hold negative values is implemented as an ArrayList.

  3. Assume that binary search trees are implemented using a BSTnode class that includes the following fields and methods:

    // fields
    private K key;
    private BSTnode<K> left, right;
     
    // methods
    public K getKey() { return key; }
    public BSTnode<K> getLeft()  { return left; }
    public BSTnode<K> getRight() { return right; }
    public void setLeft(BSTnode<K> newL)  { left  = newL; }
    public void setRight(BSTnode<K> newR) { right = newR; }

    where K is a class that implements the Comparable interface. For this question you will write the secondSmallest method whose header is given below.

    public K secondSmallest(BSTnode<K> n)

    The method should return the second smallest item in the tree or null if the tree is empty or only has one item. (Note: your method is not required to be recursive.)

Handing in

Please include your name at the top your file.

Put your answers to the questions into one file named Homework3 with the appropriate file extension, e.g., Homework3.pdf (see File Format for acceptable file formats).

Electronically submit your work to the Homework 3 Dropbox on Learn@UW.

Last Updated: 8/22/2017     © 2014-17 Beck Hasti and Charles Fischer