Recent Changes - Search:

My Research

Teaching

Main / Bio

Two paragraph standard professional bio

(or look at my C.V.)

Michael Gleicher is a Professor in the Department of Computer Sciences at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Prof. Gleicher is founder and leader of the Department's Computer Graphics group. His research generally revolves around the question: "How can we use our understanding of human perception and artistic traditions to improve our tools for communicating and data understanding." He has been exploring this question in four areas: visualization (creating tools to help people make sense of complex data sets); creating better tools for the creation of images and video; creating better character animation technologies for films and games; and computational structural biology. Prof. Gleicher is an ACM Distinguished Scientist.

Prior to joining the university, Prof. Gleicher was a researcher at The Autodesk Vision Technology Center and at Apple Computer's Advanced Technology Group. He earned his Ph. D. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University, and holds a B.S.E. in Electrical Engineering from Duke University.

(older version, approximately 2009)

Michael Gleicher is a Professor in the Department of Computer Sciences at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Prof. Gleicher is founder and leader of the Department's Computer Graphics group. The overall goal of his research is to create tools that make it easier to create pictures, video, animation, and virtual environments; and to make these visual artifacts more interesting, entertaining, and informative. He seeks to build and apply an understanding of human perception, artistic traditions, numerical computation, and geometry. His current focus is on tools for character animation, for the automated production of multimedia, and visualization and geometric analysis for biological applications, particularly structural bioinformatics.

Prior to joining the university, Prof. Gleicher was a researcher at The Autodesk Vision Technology Center and at Apple Computer's Advanced Technology Group. He earned his Ph. D. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University, and holds a B.S.E. in Electrical Engineering from Duke University.

More illustrated version

In 2009, I was promoted to Professor. I also finally redid this page after 10 years, but I just copied old stuff.

In 2004, I was promoted to Associate Professor (i.e. tenured). I also married Julie Loehrl. Our son Sam was born on April 5, 2005.

In August of 1998, I joined the faculty of the Computer Science Department at the University of Wisconsin Madison as an Assistant Professor. My mission is to start a computer graphics group. As of last check, I am succeeding.

From June of 1997 to July of 1998 I was a "research scientist" in Autodesk's now defunct Vision Technology Center. I did not work on any Autodesk products, but I did research on video tracking, motion capture and editing techniques.

From August of 1994 through March of 1997 I was a research scientist in the graphics group of Apple Computer's research laboratories (which was usually called the Advanced Technology Group, but they kept changing the name). I worked on a variety of research projects involving computer animation, computer vision, and user interfaces.

I was a graduate student in the Computer Science Department of Carnegie Mellon University from August 1988 through August 1994. While I was there, I earned a PhD and an MS. My thesis, "A Differential Approach to Graphical Interaction" was supervised by Andy Witkin.

I was an undergraduate at Duke University, and recieved a BSE in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. I didn't do any computer graphics while I was there.

Some personal info:

I lived in Springfield, NJ until I went to college. My parents still live there. My dad's company is on the web.

I generally like things involving mountains, music, and food. I like to downhill ski, play guitar and bass, and cook.

(yes, the picture to the left is me)

History - Print - Recent Changes - Search
Page last modified on December 30, 2011, at 02:56 PM